muddybrooks

My experiences post total pancreatectomy.

Learned some new cool facts about T1D vs surgical T1D

Happy Saturday!! Hope you are enjoying your weekend!!

At a recent endo apt, I learned an interesting fact about glucagon production in T1D versus surgical T1D. Again, although I’m an RN, for the purpose of this blog I am not a diabetes professional and you should ask your T1D team for further info and confirmation of what is offered here. Now, with that out of the way, let me tell you what I learned…

I asked my doc about glucagon in the diabetes population. I had heard conflicting information regarding the different types of diabetes and the PWD’s ability to produce glucagon. In T2D, the person’s alpha cells that produce glucagon work ok in the beginning of the disease process. But as the disease progresses, her/his ability to produce glucagon is diminished.

In the straight up, immunodeficient T1D, again the alpha cells are able to produce glucagon, but when the beta cells which produce insulin are unable to do so, the alpha cells get confused. Medical science has not come up with the reasoning behind this yet, but we’re hoping they are able to do so at some point in the future! These confused alpha cells, produce some glucagon but are not able to get it where it needs to go in the event of a low.

In surgical T1D, there is no production of glucagon because the alpha cells have been removed along with the beta cells and the rest of the pancreas. I’m hoping to have a discussion with my transplant surgeon soon, so I can ask him if alpha cells are transplanted along with the beta cells during the auto (meaning your own cells so no immunosuppressant drugs are necessary) islet cell transplant that occurs in the type of surgery I had for chronic pancreatitis. I’m not sure if the purification process that currently is available can separate the alpha from the beta or if they just get transplanted together and we all hope for the best. Plus, I’d like to know if the alpha cells are as sturdy as the beta cells and do they survive the purification and transplanting process. I’ll get back to you when I know more on this point.

It’s important, if you are on insulin therapy to ask your doctor for a glucagon prescription and carry it with you at all times. It’s better to have it and not need it, than to need it and to be without. My endo didn’t offer it to me but after reading many articles on the DOC (Diabetes Online Community), I learned that I needed a script. My doc didn’t hesitate to give me one but it confuses me that we have to ask for it when, I believe, it should be offered to anyone on insulin therapy. That’s because, it is more likely to experience a low with insulin than other forms of treatment, so we should be prepared just in case.

There are instructions in the glucagon case on how to use it and there are many youtube.com videos detailing how to use it. as well as, an iPhone free glucagon app that is an excellent resource for friends with an iPhone. I have had glucagon get-togethers with friends and family with the purpose of explaining lows to those who love me and also, explain the glucagon and how it is used. I take expired glucagon kits and let friends and family practice with them. This goes a long way when and if there is ever a low that I can’t reverse by myself. Hopefully soon, as a result of all the closed loop system research going on, that a better form of glucagon than the one currently available will soon be developed and made available.

In my opinion, it doesn’t seem to matter if your T1D or T2D or a surgical T1D. The glucagon whether there or not, is not able to be used in the manner a normal functioning pancreas is able to provide. Therefor, we must supplement the glucagon if the low is incapacitating the PWD or treat the low before it gets that bad with immediate release forms of glucose. I just thought it was interesting to know what is actually happening in the different forms of diabetes, so I’m passing this along to you.

Remember, TEST!! DON’T GUESS!!!

 

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Friends For Life Conference 2014

I’m excited to say I’m going to my first Friends For Life conference in Orlando put on by Children With Diabetes organization and supported by many of the diabetes tech and insulin makers. I’m a little nervous because I’m going totally alone but I’m sure I’ll make some great new friends along the way.

I recently became a Glu Ambassador so I will be volunteering some of my time at the Glu booth greeting people in the exhibition hall, so I will be spending some time with my friends from Glu and meeting new people, so, I’m looking forward to that!

I’ve registered for a diabetes advocacy program called MasterLab, masterminded by the people at Diabetes Hands Foundation. I’m hoping to soon become a member of Diabetes Advocacy and hope to become more involved with promoting access to all treatments for diabetes for everyone despite insurance or no insurance. As you know from my first post during blog week, my advocacy baby is getting Medicare on board with everyone on Medicare having access to CGM’s. Once a PWD hits 65 yrs old and has Medicare as their primary insurance, if that person has been using a CGM covered by private insurance, Medicare will NOT cover it and the PWD is invited to pay out-of-pocket or lose their CGM. IMHO, this is ridiculous!! And, don’t get me started on the limited amount of strip coverage that exists. Unbelievably, the argument that these modalities prevent or stave of the incidence of diabetes related complication, thereby reducing costs, doesn’t seem to matter. So, this is just the first topic of my advocacy efforts. I’ve already written to my local Reps and Senators as a first step in the process.

I, also, believe strongly in uniting the PWD with others struggling with diabetes and similar issues. Education makes us stronger and, again, IMHO, better able to manage our diabetes, no  matter the type. This blog grew out of my need to belong and find others struggling and feeling very much alone as I was. I hope you all are enjoying my posts and I appreciate you all following along reading my posts and commenting. It means the world to me. If I touch just one person and make a difference in her/his life, I’ve accomplished my original goal. (BTW, if there is anything you want me to cover just comment and let me know!)

Is there anything you would like me to gather info for at Friends For Life (FFL)? Any areas where you’re seeking answers to questions you have? Let me know if I can research and gather any specific info you would like or need. I’m going to this conference, first and foremost to connect with other PWD but also, equally as important, to strengthen my knowledge base. I’m really looking forward to the MasterLAb but I’m also hoping to go to Gary Scheiner’s presentation called, “Strike The Spike” dealing with after meal high BG (also known as postprandial spikes…medical jargon at its best!!).

Joe Soloweijczyk, RN, CDE is also presenting a talk called, “It’s Not Just A Numbers Game”. I’ve recently become acquainted with his work online. He has a five informational presentations called “Chalk Talks” on you tube if your interested. And Tudiabetes did an interview with Joe about diabetes in his life. I was riveted to my computer. It lasted an hour and I was sad when it was over. He’s an awesome diabetes advocate. I first learned of him thru Kelley Kunik’s blog “diabetesaliciousness”.  She became acquainted with him during her first days as a child with diabetes when Joe was just a college student forging his way in the world.

Sorry, I’m babbling but I just wanted to give you an idea of what I will be doing starting in nine days. I’ll write a couple of posts when I get back reviewing all that I learned so I can pass it along to you. My biggest goal in going to Orlando, is being able to grow my blog and increase the quality of my writing and the info presented. I don’t want to be “just another diabetes blog”! I want to help other people with her/his daily managing and have something interesting to say.

Thank you all for following along so far!! I appreciate the support!!

Have a great Sunday!!

 

And Remember!! CHECK!! DON’T GUESS!!

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My Biggest supporter not only T1D but life in general.

I’ve been thinking lately that will the people who support me now in the beginning stages of my T1D journey be there for the long haul. Having had chronic pancreatitis I saw supposed friends come and go over the years but one person has remained strong in his support of me over the years…my husband.

Last week we celebrated our 30th wedding anniversary. (I can’t believe I’m old enough to say that!!) The card I got him  says,

“We’ve been through a lot together. You’ve seen me at my best, my worst, and first thing in the morning.”

But he truly has seen me at my best and my worst, and that’s not always first thing in the morning!! But despite him experiencing me at my worst more often than I like to admit, he stays with me…and I with him. I can count on him through thick and thin. We have a system that although might not work for others, works for us.

But as I said, this got me to thinking…how many friends will I lose due to yet another chronic disease to contend with. My life with chronic pancreatitis left me with a much smaller circle of friends due to my inability to always be able to keep social plans I made when I was feeling well.

Through all of my medical struggles though, and I think the T1D journey will be no different, I have met and continue to interact with some amazing people. I definitely have learned who my true friends are through all of the ups and downs. I have met some girls through a mutual love of all things sewing and I’m betting they’ll be supporting me through all of the good times and the bad times of the coming years, just as I will continue to support and love them.

I also have come to rely, respect and admire some amazing doctors and nurses that have come to be an integral part of my healthcare team. I’ve fired some less than stellar medical people through my tenure with chronic illness but have a truly remarkable team now that I know I can all upon at a moments notice, just like my husband. Although chronic illness stinks, I have met some amazing people who, if not for the illness, I wouldn’t have met. So, I’m thankful for all of the facets of my life, even the negative stuff.

What is the most positive aspect of your diabetes?? Who is your biggest supporter?

 

Remember, CHECK!! DON’T GUESS!!

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Hospitalization used as an opportunity to complete basal testing.

Every now and then, my “new normal”, the results of having had a total pancreatectomy, rises up and makes themselves the center of my attention. I occasionally experience significant abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, but after a few days inpatient, my symptoms subside & I can resume my daily life activities in my own home. I also need to use jejunostomy tube feeding (to supplement what I am able to eat by mouth) every night. When I’m having a flare of my worst symptoms, I cannot infuse my tube feeding nor can I eat anything orally. So, this usually requires that I get admitted to my local teaching hospital for what I call a “tune up”. This means I get IV fluids and medications to alleviate my symptoms until they back off and let me resume my life.

As one can imagine, I dislike being in the hospital. The smells, becoming dependent on the nurse of the day for all your care and for her/him to communicate for you to the doctor. And, in today’s medical world, I’m never admitted to my own doctor because they now have what’s called a hospitalist whose job it is to care for folks like me in the hospital. They don’t see people outpatient in an office because their office is the hospital floors. Kind of like the TV character, House, MD. So, not only am I feeling like crap, I then have to relay my story to this new person whom I don’t know and she/he doesn’t know me AT ALL. So that fact lends itself to all kinds of anxiety, like, will she/he really understand what is going on with me. And, usually 9 times out of 10, the hospitalist tries to reinvent the wheel, meaning I have to repeat medications I’ve already tried because this new doctor thinks his way will be more successful than the last doctor’s way. And I have had to repeat diagnostic testing more times than I can count because if you tick off a doctor by telling her/him no, that brings up a whole set of problems I don’t have the time nor the inclination to get into. That’s a whole other topic to post about.  Suffice it to say, I try to play nice with the new hospitalist no matter how much of an a$$ she/he is.

During a recent admission, I had the pleasure of being cared for by my own endo and his nurse practitioner. For some reason, my admission coincided with their on call schedule. I was delighted, to say the least, as I was having a difficult time with (according to my Dexcom Studio software)  spending 75-80% of the day higher than my target range. Which means I was feeling like crap 75-80% of the time.  So, we used this admission as a glorified basal testing grounds. I was taking nothing by mouth and my tube feeding were being held until my symptoms resolved, so I was going to be able to see what my BG’s did all by themselves without the added food.

I kept detailed BG records (what else did I have to do?! Did I mention I don’t enjoy day time television? OK, truth be told, I’m a sucker for “Kelly and Michael” but that’s it I swear!! Oh no, wait! Kind of enjoy “Kathy Lee and Hoda” but nothing else. Hmmmm, seems I forgot to mention the “Chew”. What?? I’m trying to learn how to cook but, this time I pinky swear, nothing else. I was too busy recording blood sugars!! But I digress.) I welcomed a purpose to my admission, especially if it was going to help me on the outside, as well as, help me feel better day to day. My NP, CDE (nurse practitioner and certified diabetic educator) came by usually at the end of the day and we reviewed my logs. We discovered I need to add a second basal at night for both scenarios of when I’m infusing and the nights I don’t. My basal, or continuous insulin needs are different at different times of the day, which is a very common scenario. During the day I need a higher rate than on the nights I don’t infuse (usually because I’m having a problem with abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting) and on the nights I do infuse, I need a higher rate than I even need during the day due to the increased continuous infusion of carbs (carbohydrates). We slowly tweaked the rates increasing from my old settings by 0.025 units of insulin per hour at the different times of each day and finally came up with my new rates.  I’m happy to say that so far, so good!! I know it’s only been a couple of days but already my BG’s are trending within my target range!! Woo Hoo!! Take that, diabetes!!

I have to say that I’ve been able to make such small increments in my insulin doses thanks to one of the triplets of my D technology…my Medtronics 530 G insulin pump, named Daisy ( the other two being my Dexcom and my BG meter). This never would have been possible when I was on MDI (multiple daily injections). So, I’m, as always, grateful to have access to this amazing D technology!!

I’m usually a positive type of person but being admitted to the hospital with pain especially is no fun, so I was happy to be distracted a little from my symptoms by trying to figure out how to decrease these persistent highs I had been having.  Generally, I HATE keeping written logs!! I rely heavily on Carelink & Dexcom Studio to interpret my data and keep me from going nuts trying to record everything while at the same time, trying to live life. This admission gave me the opportunity to keep very a very accurate log and help myself obtain better BG control.

Do you hate to keep logs as much as I do?? Do you regularly use the software for your D technology to keep track of patterns and trends? Any tips on how I could become a better log keeper, especially when it comes to food logs? Along with laundry, they are the bane of my existence!

And, Remember, CHECK…DON’T GUESS!!

 

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Book review: Shot: Staying Alive with Diabetes by Amy F. Ryan

I recently read a book that from the time I sat down and began to read, I couldn’t put it down! I ended up staying up way too late just to read as much as I could. The story was very compelling. It is not only the autobiography of Amy Ryan’s life but also details her new life with type 1 diabetes  having been misdiagnosed as type 2 due to her age at the time she sought the medical advice of her doctor. She was 29 years old and had been healthy up until this point but an unrelenting yeast infection was her presenting symptom. She writes of how her life was turned upside down trying to navigate the treatment plan she was given that didn’t seem to be working due to her misdiagnosis.

What I really like is that she is able to put into words the daily struggle to manage diabetes and to live life to its fullest despite all of the effort required to truly manage this disease. And, she doesn’t shy away from telling about the times she’s struggled with burnout.

As a young woman, Amy tackles the issues related to deciding how to administer the insulin that she needs to survive, including issues with intimacy and the insulin pump, what a successful pregnancy needs her to add to an already full management schedule every day. And, she’s not shy when she writes about her own emotional struggles and how to share that part of diabetes with those closest to her.

I thoroughly recommend this book, especially to young women and men who are diagnosed as adults with diabetes. And, although her story is about type 1 and what it entailed for her, I believe it pertains to any form of diabetes.

Recently, a close friend of mine had a number of questions about my daily life as compared to my life before my T1D diagnosis. I gave her a copy of Amy’s book for her to read. This friend had very limited knowledge of diabetes in general and we were able to discuss the book together and then my daily management tools I use to live my life as healthy as possible. It started the discussion for us, and I believe it can help others start the discussion with the people who care about them.

The book written by Amy F Ryan is, Shot: Staying Alive with Diabetes, published by Hudson Whitman, Excelsior College Press, Albany, NY, copy write 2013.

This review is my own. I have not been asked nor have I been paid to write this. I just love the book and wanted to share it with others who could gain something personal by reading it.

 

Remember…CHECK! DON’T GUESS!!

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Is it me??

I recently developed a relatively new pet peeve and I’m wondering what other PWD think about this…

 

Last week I was casually chatting with a friend about how I’d had a very low blood sugar that morning (31mg/dl) that was unexpected and I was still kind of in a light fog because of it. He asked me what it felt like. He seemed concerned about this hypoglycemic event and he is a healthcare worker, so I thought I would do a little “inservice” (the medical community uses the “inservice” to educate our peers on new equipment, meds, etc). I gave him a short list of what it could feel like to anyone and as I was explaining that each PWD has her/his own set of symptoms, he suddenly cut my “inservice” short, exclaiming, “that’s what happened to me this morning!”

OK. I didn’t know he had difficulty with his blood sugars regulating on their own, by way of his normal, completely functioning islet cells but maybe I didn’t know something about his current health situation. When I asked him what his symptoms were, he told me, “I got a bad headache when I skipped breakfast.” I inquired further and, no, nothing was wrong with his normal functioning islet cells. Maybe you were just hungry? He quickly replied, “No, I wasn’t hungry! I had a low blood sugar just like you described!” I asked him what he did to correct it and he calmly stated, “Oh, I just popped a couple of Advil and went about my day. But, boy, was I starving at lunch.” WHAT??!!

I calmed my racing, shocked pulse down and just decided to move the conversation along because I got the feeling this friend had no clue what a true hypoglycemic incident is about. I changed the subject and we got to the business of catching up. I decided the “inservice” would have been lost on this person anyway.

This is a first for me on this Type 1 journey. My inner circle of family and friends has been very supportive and frequently asks questions so they can better understand what’s going on with me, like I do with them when something’s going on with them that I don’t understand. It’s a normal give and take amongst friends & family. But this person is just outside of my inner circle, so I shouldn’t have been surprised when he really wasn’t concerned about me at all, just his headache’s cause (even though it was pretty obvious the missed meal was most likely the cause. But, in his defense, maybe his blood sugar was at the lower end of his normal glucose range.)

I’m still wondering why I was so amped up by his response. It seems to me that many PWD fear the low!!! And just “popping a few Advil”  wouldn’t correct a true low blood sugar. Maybe I’ve been in a little bubble where it’s been all about me as I navigate this new world?(I’m definitely learning it’s NOT all about me) I don’t know but I’m thinking that my fear of a low and this person’s delight in figuring out what caused his headache, shocked me.

When we were preparing to part ways, I mentioned to him that he should start carrying immediate glucose foods with him to combat the lows he might experience in the future.

How do you respond when someone seems uneducated on what you’re experiencing due to diabetes and compares it to something in her/his nondiabetic life?

 

Remember…CHECK. DON’T GUESS!!!

 

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Interpreting Blood Glucose Trends

OK. I’m a little confused by my BG trends lately. I’m learning there are many seemingly hidden variables to diabetes which frustrates the hell out of me as I’m sure it does you too!! Some days they’re not so hidden and I can identify why I am high or low. But other days I can’t find an answer to why I’m trending the way I am. Will my ability to figure out my BG values before they happen get better with time?? I’m beginning to think not.

I’ve been reading a lot of new (to me) diabetes blogs since my introduction to them from Blog Week 2014 and I’m reading that some T1D veterans experience the same thing. I don’t know if that fact is frightening or reassuring. Is it always gonna be this hard to anticipate what a meal or a walk is going to effect my BG?? I was hoping it would get easier but I’m not going to hold my breath waiting!!

I’ve recently started to pre-bolus after seeing an old recording of an interview of Gary Scheiner, CDE of the year, 2013, by TuDiabetes’ Emily Coles (http://tudiabetes.com) in which he recommended getting a handle on postprandial (after meals) high BG’s by bolusing for the amount of carbs in an anticipated meal by 15 or 20 minutes. This helps improve the timing of when your insulin starts to work with when the carbs (carbohydrates) from the meal are absorbed, hopefully, preventing that dreaded spike. I’ve had some successes but I failed miserably tonight and I can’t figure out why.

Bear with me as I rehash what happened with you in the hopes that one of you may be able to help me by figuring out what I did wrong… Twenty minutes before a usual dinner of spaghetti, meatballs and a slice of garlic bread, I bolused for 66 carbs (the usual amount I always bolus for and have had success with.) The spaghetti was weighed out, so I know it was the same serving size and the garlic bread was pretty much the same size I always eat give or take only 2 or 3 carbs. Just as I was finishing up, I started to get really sweaty all of a sudden. I didn’t think I was low. How could I be?? I usually get high at this point in my spaghetti dinner.

I didn’t treat for the feeling, nor did I check Dex. (It was in my purse and I was too lazy to go get it!) I was certain I wasn’t low!! It had to be a result of the suddenly warm New England day of 80 degrees with some moderate humidity. Only when I broke out in a full sweat and started to experience that ravenous hunger only associated with a low, (even though I had just eaten a whole meal!!) did I actually test…results?? 41!!!! How could that be?? I hadn’t had any activity before dinner. As a matter of fact, the day had been largely sedentary, so activity wasn’t the cause. I couldn’t figure it out and still can’t! It was such a scary low this time that now I’m afraid to pre-bolus if it means chancing feeling like that again!!! (I treated with my 4 rolls of Smarties and quickly felt better, but it was definitely hard to consume those Smarties as I was very full after my delicious meal!)

I think if I had to describe what is most frustrating to me about my T1D, I would have to say this concept of doing exactly the same thing from one day to the next and getting two completely different BG values and trends, is it. Can any of you D veterans tell me if this gets any easier??

I am very thankful to have Dex and my BG meter to identify when these things happen.  (I don’t always have low symptoms and usually I don’t get symptoms until I’ve dropped below 50 and they come on fast. )Back in the day, this wouldn’t have been possible and I would have had to wing it. If I had to become a PWD (person with diabetes) then getting it now in the new millennium is definitely better than the mid 1900’s. Technology has come so far in thirty years. I’m excited to see what is coming in the near future in D tech!!

I guess if we’re trying our best with what is available to us at the time, then we can’t ask any more of ourselves. (But I think we all do!!)

Remember, Check! Don’t Guess!! See where my guessing got me tonight??!!

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I’m Angry!!!

I’m really angry with the fact that I have to deal with surgical T1D!!! But I feel I don’t have the right to be. After all, I chose this…well, sort of. I’m the one that decided to have the rest of my pancreas removed February 8,2013, after having had half of it removed January 31,1994 due to chronic pancreatitis. I knew diabetes, type one, was a real possibility, but I really didn’t think it would happen to me!! Seriously, I was having MY islet cells removed, before they threw away the rest of my pancreas, purified and then transplanted back into my right kidney where there is a large blood supply. There was no risk of rejection. So, surely, my islets would be happy there and continue to provide me with the insulin I would need for the rest of my life. Right? WRONG!!!

My transplant surgeon explained to me the usual scenario with the rates of T1D after pancreatectomy. One third of patients require no insulin and their islet cells take after transplantation and all is well with the world. Another third, some of the islets take and they only require a little bit of insulin. And, the last third, the islet transplantation fails and these people have to deal with what I was told is “brittle diabetes”, meaning wildly fluctuating blood sugars that are difficult to control. I truly never thought I would become part of the last third. I wholeheartedly believed my transplant would take. These are, after all, my own islet cells. What would make them fail??(I have to say though, that I don’t feel my diabetes is unmanageable! Is it difficult? Yes, but so is everyone else’s diabetes. I feel very fortunate to be managing my BG’s fairly well. I was so scared I’d be dealing with this unmanageable beast and I’d be riddled with complications in short order. This, thankfully is not the case!!)

Right after my surgery, in the surgical ICU, my islets seemed to be functioning beautifully but I was requiring a minimal amount of short acting insulin. OK. So, I would be one of those that had some success but would need a little bit of insulin. I could deal with that. A few days later, I developed a high fever that was sustained for a number of hours despite Tylenol. Immediately following the fever, I started to require large amounts of insulin with fluctuating BG’s. This can’t be happening, I thought!! Seriously, I was given a brief foray into partial success with the need for only small amounts of insulin, but now, a fever wiped out my islets!!! I couldn’t believe it. I had tasted success only to have it ripped away.

Boy was I angry!!! But, right away, I felt bad for being angry. I knew this was a possibility, yet I chose to have the surgery anyway. Who did I think I was being angry?? I was thinking about all those who had innocently acquired T1D through no fault of their own, especially the children, yet, I directly had a hand in my T1D and I had the gall to be angry? This is how I continue to feel. I don’t know if it’s right or wrong but I feel directly responsible for my diabetes, so I have no right to be angry.

I’m also angry with myself for not even considering the possibility that my islets would fail resulting in T1D. Maybe then I could have researched the whole thing and been prepared for what was to come. NOPE!!! I did NO research until after I was discharged home from the hospital, and then I couldn’t read enough about it!! I always feel guilty when I have these times of feeling angry about the whole diabetes thing.

Part of the reason I started this blog is because I feel I don’t “fit in” in the diabetes community because I didn’t get my diabetes from an autoimmune disease or through genetics. There are some things that are different about my T1D than the usual PWD. So far, I haven’t met, face-to-face, any other surgical T1D’s. Luckily, though, I have a group of us that communicate through Facebook. I don’t know what I would have done in the beginning if I didn’t have this community of people. We all have had the same surgery and find ourselves dealing with this “Daily Guessing Game” together. I would, however, like to connect with some other surgical diabetics that live in my area or here on Muddybrooks. People that have either had a pancreatectomy through a trauma or electively, like myself. We can learn a lot from each other. How do you feel about your diabetes??

Hope you’re having a great Wednesday and I apologize that this isn’t a “Wordless Wednesday” pictorial post. But I just had to get this off of my chest. Thanks for reading along!!

 

Remember, Check!! Don’t Guess!!

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Have you joined Glu yet??

Hi!! and Happy Tuesday!! Have you heard about Glu yet?? It’s a Boston based nonprofit that, as I understand it, is a community based group of PWD that collects data for potential future research projects. They are connected to many of the diabetes clinics around the country, as well as to the research institutes, and talk with them regularly. They have a question of the day regarding your diabetes with some of the questions being submitted by users of the site. It’s an interesting and fun way to begin your day and it starts many conversations through the comment section of each question.

The most visible people from Glu are GluAnna-Anna Floreen and GluBill-Bill Woods, whom many of you may have seen his earlier videos on http://youtube.com. They hold events related to dealing with diabetes, most recently a presentation from Tandem T Slim and Dexcom. I attended the Dexcom event that you may have read about here. Glu is on the forefront of immerging research because they hear from their users about what we want from our technology to better manage our disease.

You can check Glu out at http://myglu.org. I really love connecting with other PWD & Glu has a large community of us who regularly use the site. Go ahead!! Check it out and maybe even sign up!! You won’t be sorry.

Remember…Check!! Don’t Guess!!

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Correction of website posted Monday, June 2, 2014

Hi! Just a quick correction. The website for Pump Wear is http://pumpwearinc.com Thanks!!

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